Laura Fortune

M E T A L S M I T H & I L L U S T R A T O R

 
 
Just because you’re trash doesn’t mean you can’t do great things.
It is called a garbage can, not a garbage cannot.
— Oscar the Grouch
 
 

The Lady

Humor, pop culture, graffiti, kitsch, abandoned store fronts and convenient stores are a few inspirations for Laura Fortune.  A gal who grew up in a colorful house in the southern United States, made a colorful home in Brooklyn, NY, and now sees it connect through her travels.  She lived in NYC for 13 years and packed it up to travel and continues to make work where she lands.  

Laura received her BFA in Metal from SUNY New Paltz and while in school began working in the studios of J.Cotter and Annette Ferdinandsen, and continued working professionally in NYC in the studios of TenThousandThings and Ted Muehling.  

Laura currently travels with her studio and is making her homebase in Lisbon, Portugal.  

Style & Quality

All the style.  All the quality.

The jewelry is made by hand. Everything can be duplicated, but each will have it's own thing going on, without compromising the quality and craftsmanship that is being thrown down.

The illustration is all hand drawn and painted on paper and inspired by the travels that are taking place.

 

100% Handmade

Every piece is made by Laura.  

e·nam·el

noun

an opaque or semitransparent glassy substance applied to metallic or other hard surfaces for ornament or as a protective coating.

verb

coat or decorate (a metallic or hard object) with enamel.

ill-us-tra-tion

the action or fact of illustrating something

What the heck is enamel and how is it done?

Enamel comes in a wide range of colors and looks like very fine sand or powder.  It is a glassy compound applied to and bonded by heat (fusion) to a metal surface.  This powder is applied, by one of several methods, to the metal surface. Next the article is placed at 1500 degrees F in a kiln. The metal may be fired from 1 to 5 minutes, depending on size or technique. The article is removed and allowed to cool to room temperature. Subsequent coats of enamel and many firings are required to bring about the desired results. The word ‘Enamel’ refers to the glass material as well as to the finished product.